No excuses for California Democrat Supermajority

Finally! Democrats in the state legislature can no longer blame their failures on the California GOP. In the recent election Democrats gained a two thirds Supermajority in the Assembly and State Senate. With the new configuration of the legislature, Republicans are unable block any bill, nor can they overturn a veto by Governor Brown. In short the California Republican Party (CRP) is no longer a force to be compromised with in Sacramento. Continue reading “No excuses for California Democrat Supermajority”

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Democrats OK Tibet violence

Chinese violence against Tibet is supported by the California Legislature run by Democrats

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California’s Democratic leadership in the legislature, defeated an effort to recognize the struggle of the Tibetan people against violent overthrow from the Chinese Communist government; whose agents lobbied Democrats in Sacramento to look the other way. Tom Torlakson, Mark DeSaulnier, Loni Hancock, and Joan Buchanan participated in the conspiracy of silence. China has closed down access to Youtube video of the violence. I am ashamed.

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California reform ideas

TOP DOWN APPROACH

Last week Gavin Newsom gave a speech about California as part of his exploration of his chances for running for Governor. In the course of the event he spoke about the Bottom Up approach in dealing with major issues in the economy such as bringing back vegetable gardens in your back yard and even in the City Hall grounds to cut down on the transportation pollution to bring food to your table. However in reflection, we do not approach problems from the Bottom Up but in fact from the Top Down. It is leadership that (to risk redundancy) LEADS. The spreading out of a solution to a problem that involves the mass power of individual small efforts comes from leadership not from the bottom up.

We in California are faced with the breakdown in leadership and more critically the leadership structure of the state government that is no longer able to function as viewed from just about any neighborhood. What we need is to start to change things from The Top Down.

The legislature is divided into two parts with 40 officials in the Senate and 80 in the Assembly.This should be eliminated and reduced to a single chamber with 1 representative for each congressional district. That would cut the number of people involved by over 50%. While I am a firm believer that Government is the most expensive form of entertainment on the planet, clearly having more of these comedians does not increase the appeal of their jokes – or was that legislation? After all, if the state is to be basically dealt with in a series of party oriented divides we might as well have less people involved. Additionally by using the same districts we can begin to get uniformity in government and save on all the duplicate gerrymandering that goes on.

Remove the position of the Lt. Governor whose only real function is to serve when the Governor is absent, and replace him with the Leader of the new Representative Assembly that is elected by that body.

Then taking it from the top, we go down the entire chain of appointed officers and remove 50-60% of them. If there are 7 commissioners appointed to a panel, then we do only 3.  This cuts down greatly on the available political patronage to the political party in power thus reducing their internal power politics and allow for that shocking concept of doing the people’s business to creep back into government service.

It all starts at the Top and then it can work its way down. 

 

Edi Birsan

Hoping for Easy Does It government in my lifetime.

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California legislature and unions block volunteer help

Look for the Union Label, California! Dan Weintraub reports that the California State Legislature has held up an exemption for volunteers that want to help public works projects that receive government money; for instance library, hospital, and school field trip volunteers, to name just a few. Democratic Assembly opponents, looking to protect public employee unions, have held up a vote for an exemption for volunteers (Assembly Bill 2537) by requiring a $4,000,000 study to make sure libraries just aren’t trying to cut down on union labor hours. With the budget the way it is, such an outrageous price tag for a study that won’t cost that much unless Senator Perata does it will not even get to the floor for a vote. Since we know Messers DeSaulnier and Torlakson can’t explain this one to their dumbfounded constituents, perhaps Assembly District 15 candidates Abram Wilson or Joan Buchanan can make sense of this buffoonery?

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California’s top lobbying interests

The SacBee has posted a list of California’stop 10 biggest spenders of lobbying money in the first six months of 2008, according to filings with the secretary of state.

1. California Hospital Association, $3.405 million
2. California Teachers Association, $2.699 million
3. Western State Petroleum Association, $2.644 million
4. California State Service Employees (SEIU), $2.555 million
5. Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians, $2.113 million
6. Blue Cross of California, $2.044 million
7. California Chamber of Commerce, $1.467 million
8. Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association, $1.426 million
9. Golden State Water Company, $1.189 million
10. AT&T, $1.168 million Continue reading “California’s top lobbying interests”

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California spending more but enjoying it less

Someone from Southern California has finally stopped drinking the Kool Aid the California Legislature is serving up and asks: Where has all the money gone? This is the question that USC business professor, John Matsusaka, asked in the LA Timestly picked up widely by othert papers including the San Jose Mercury News. In fact, he asks the crucial question that if the state government is spending 40% more than it was four years ago, about the time Mark DeSaulnier has been an Assemblyman – why aren’t we feeling the impact of improved services, roads, schools, etc.? Masusaka asks, “Legislators, pundits and interest groups warn of dire consequences if state spending is slowed or cut. But if most Californians haven’t detected a significant change from the last $41 billion, including 40% more on schools, will they notice if some of that spending disappears?” Continue reading “California spending more but enjoying it less”

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